Turbulent Non-Premixed Flames Stabilized on Double-Slit Curved Wall-Jet Burner with Simultaneous OH-Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence and Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements

M.S. Mansour, S.H. Chung
Combustion Science and Technology 187 (9), 1408-1424, (2015)

Turbulent Non-Premixed Flames Stabilized on Double-Slit Curved Wall-Jet Burner with Simultaneous OH-Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence and Particle Image Velocimetry Measurements

Keywords

Double-slit curved wall-jet (CWJ) burner, Flame extinction, OH-planar laser-induced fluorescence (OH-PLIF), Particle image velocimetry (PIV), Strain rate, Turbulent non-premixed flame

Abstract

​A double-slit curved wall-jet (CWJ) burner utilizing a Coanda effect by supplying fuel and air as annular-inward jets over a curved surface was employed to investigate the stabilization characteristics and structure of propane/air turbulent non-premixed flames with varying global equivalence ratio and Reynolds number. Simultaneous time-resolved measurements of particle image velocimetry (PIV) and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) of OH radicals were conducted. The burner showed a potential of stable and non-sooting operation for relatively large fuel loading and overall rich conditions. Mixing characteristics in cold flow were first examined using an acetone fluorescence technique, indicating substantial transport between the fuel and air by exhibiting appreciable premixing conditions. PIV measurements revealed that the flow field consisted of a wall-jet region leading to a recirculation zone through flow separation, an interaction jet region resulting from the collision of annular-inward jets, followed by a merged-jet region. The flames were stabilized in the recirculation zone and, in extreme cases, only a small flame seed remained in the recirculation zone. Together with the collision of the slit jets in the interaction jet region, the velocity gradients in the shear layers at the boundaries of the annular jets generate the turbulence. Turbulent mean and rms velocities were influenced by the presence of the flame, particularly in the recirculation zone. Flames with a high equivalence ratio were found to be more resistant to local extinction and exhibited a more corrugated and folded nature, particularly at high Reynolds numbers. For flames with a low equivalence ratio, local quenching and re-ignition processes maintained flames in the merged jet region, revealing a strong intermittency, which was substantiated by the increased principal strain rates for these flames

Code

DOI: 10.1080/00102202.2015.1042103

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